Meeker's
Mechanical
Nature Antiques
Larry and Carole
Meeker

Purveyors of Americana
Patented & Mechanical Antiques
www.Patented-Antiques.com

patentedantiques@gmail.com
Orders / Inquiries / Questions

530-748-7297
(ORDERS ONLY)

Antique & Vintage
Patent Models / Salesman Samples & Store Display Models


Wheeler & Wilson No. 8  Genuine Salesman Sample /ANTIQUE Display Model Sewing MachineMiniature Wheeler & Wilson No. 8 Sewing Machine Display Model / Salesman Sample / Patent Model This is the real deal. This genuine miniature Salesman sample sewing machine is very graphic and looks great. I have been at this going on 40 years now, and use to specialize in toy and child size sewing machines, as well as patent models of sewing machines. In all that time I have never seen or heard of another example of this special little sewing machine. I do not use the term rare often, but this tiny salesman sample Wheeler & Wilson # 8 sewing machine fits the bill.

After having discussed it with a few other knowledgeable folks I will tell you what I think. Given the size, with no dimension much over 12", it could be a patent model. The patent could be for something like the wood folding table extensions on two sides of the top, an unusual feature in its own right. Or it could be for something having to do with the treadle base. Either are possibilities, but do not explain the sewing machine, and its details, or lack of them.

Another possibility is that it is a patent model of the sewing machine itself. That it is a one of kind, as patent models were, and no others are out and about would help that argument. Also, it is very close to the right size with no dimension much over 12". One could make arguments for or against that idea, but that does not seem quite right given the construction details of the machine, and other factors.

One would also think if it was a typical salesman sample it would be larger and designed to actually work. Meaning that while the table folds as it should, and the treadle works as it should, and the moving parts of the machine move and it seems to be working when operated, the fact is that there are no moving parts under the machine involved with the needle, or provisions for actually making a stitch.

The machine looks like a dressed up exact miniature copy of the Wheeler & Wilson No.8 sewing machine that was first introduced in 1876. One would think if it was a typical salesman sample or display model for retail shops that others would be known. None are.

I believe it is a limited production promotional / sample / display model made by Wheeler & Wilson of the "New" No. 8 Wheeler & Wilson sewing machine, to be displayed or exhibited at events like Expos, Worlds Fairs, or Trade Shows during the centennial celebrations. The No. 8 Wheeler & Wilson was introduced in 1876 and that time frame would fit this idea. That would also explain the relative scarcity of no others known. Wheeler and Wilson would only need one, two or a few, for events like that. I should note it carries a brass inscribed Wheeler & Wilson logo plaque inset in the base plate. (see pics)

Another aspect or consideration is the construction of the machine and choice of materials and finish. The body has an unusual silver plated like finish. The main cross arm is decorated and polished brass. These cosmetic embellishments would lend weight to the Expo display idea. Such fine finish attributes would certainly grab one's attention as the crowds strolled by the Wheeler & Wilson display booth.

This miniature sewing machine is a wonderful and historically important piece. An opportunity not likely to repeat itself.

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WW-SS

Good + . . . . . $7850.00

To Order Email: patentedantiques@gmail.com





Adams Salesman Sample Road GraderJ. D. Adams Salesman Sample Road Grader  This is the real deal. It is very graphic and looks great. This engineering company hailed from Indianapolis IN. This is a very complicated piece of machinery. I am not totally sure, but was told there are some missing pieces / springs to hold the lower grader portion at different angles. Look at all the pics to see all the different gear boxes, adjusters, fittings and more that this has. This rare & desirable c. 1910 salesman's sample measures approx. 10.25" H x 8.5" W x 22.5" L.

The operator would stand on the grate at the rear and have to control all the different wheels and levers as the grader was being pulled along. Nice!!

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AH-ADAMS

Good . . . . . $7500.00

To Order Email: patentedantiques@gmail.com





1807 Patent Model Washing Machine1807 T. Beatty Patent Model Washing / Churning Machine  This 1807 patent model is one of the earliest US Patent Models known to exist. The patent was issued to a Thomas Beatty in 1807.

Patent Models of inventors ideas became a requirement by an act of Congress in 1790. Note that the tag says "no number". Models like this are referred to as X models and were called off by the inventors name rather than a number prior to 1836. They are very hard to research or find reference to on the internet or in the Patent Office records. They were assigned numbers later on and I believe this ones number is X 754. The patent can not be brought up with Google or at the PO site.

In 1836, and after the first Patent Office fire, all patent models were assigned numbers. The 1836 Patent Office fire destroyed all the previous models that had been submitted prior to that date. Approximately 10,000 patents had been granted between 1790 and 1835. Only about 1/4 were recovered or restored after the fire. Congress appropriated funds to have the more important models rebuilt after the initial 1836 fire and that is what we have here. The patent tag is original and held in place with the lead lock tag used by the American Patent Models Inc. back in the 30's.; They were one of several owners of the patent models after the government disposed of the entire patent model inventory or collection at auction back in 1925.

Histories of Patent Models can be found at several different internet sites.  I have a page that briefly explains the history here https://www.antiqbuyer.com/Patent_Models.html. There is much more info to be found at Wikipedia and at other sites.

This is a great model and an idea ahead of it time. Most washing machines worked on the idea of the operator or user activating a dasher, or agitator in order to perform the washing task at hand. Beatty's idea flipped this idea, and the washing machine dasher or agitator was fixed and the user would instead move or swing the container back and forth to perform the washing, churning, and scouring task. An important piece of Americana, American History and Yankee ingenuity all wrapped into one.

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GLIS-1807-PM

Good + . . . . . $6000.00 

To Order Email:  patentedantiques@gmail.com





1858 James McVicker Patent Model Washing Machine1858 James McVicker Patent Model Washing Machine  This 1858 patent model washing machine could easily win a prize for whacky idea of the year, or century for that matter. The patent is for a washing machine based on a wheel barrow like design. The patent issued to a James McVicker of Mount Morris PA. The patent number is 19788 and comes up with a Google patent search.

Mr McVicker must have had to push a wheelbarrow around in a previous occupation, and was now tasked with the washing chores around the homestead. Or perhaps he had heard or read about the great success Studebaker was having making wheel barrows in California gold country and thought he could cash in using the design and offering a new mobile wash service for the boys. What other logic could there be for such a silly looking idea.

It is kind of a hard patent to read and understand.  If I am reading it right, and in looking inside, it seems you were not supposed to operate the washer / wheelbarrow while moving the entire machine about the yard. I think you were to get it in place, set the side levers to raise the front wheel off the ground, and then operate the washer mechanism by hand where upon the wheel would become a flywheel to help with the back and forth washing or agitator action. He goes into some detail explaining how the wooden spring design seen at the back end of the model would assist in the operation as well. As I first said, WHACKY.

The model measures approx. 12" end to end and stands a bit over 6" tall. It is primarily made of a few different types of hard and soft woods with nicely done chamfers and carved aspects or details. A one of a kind.;

An important piece of Americana, American History and Yankee ingenuity all wrapped into one.

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PF-1858-PM-WASH

Good + . . . . . $3000.00 

To Order Email:  patentedantiques@gmail.com



We buy quality Antiques in this and other categories of Antiques.

To view examples of the types of antiques and collectibles we have previously sold
and are always interested in buying please visit our Past Sales Archive Pages at our sister website www.AntiqBuyer.com.

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Larry & Carole Meeker